Yearly Archive December 12, 2020

ByIESA Shift

Wanted: New Board!

All good things must come to an end, our board year as well. But, this gives you the opportunity to sign up for the next board! We’re looking for a new board from March 2021 – March 2022!

We’ll have the following positions available:


Chair

The Chair makes sure the board is running smoothly, plans ahead for the new year and works with the Events Committee to organize great social events for IE’ers such as the gala! Also, the Chair leads board meetings, makes an agenda and is the representative person during official activities.


Secretary

The Secretary has the task to manage the communication channels. Communication from Shift should be clear, since this board member is often the first port of call. The Secretary works with the Promo Committee, that takes care of the newsletter, updating the website and promotion of events!


Treasurer

The Treasurer is in charge of Shift’s money. The main responsibilities are to make a financial forecast for the coming year and to keep control of each expense, including the expenses of the committees. Next to that, the Treasurer manages our member database and helps the Study Trip Committee to organize an unforgettable study trip!


Education Coordinator

The Education Co-ordinator is responsible for all education-related topics, contributing to Shift’s goal of motivating and supporting students in their academic life. This position allows for a lot of freedom to realize ideas and the chance to support initiatives that have just started such as the “IE students meet…” event series or our international IE student cooperation. Finally, the Education Coordinator is an honorary member of the EduCom.


Alumni and Career Coordinator

The Business and Alumni Coordinator focuses on everything that comes after studying IE, making use of, extending and strengthening Shift’s rich network of alumni and partnering companies. By taking part in the Career Committee (which organises our annual Career Event) and by sharing or (co-)organising business-related opportunities you help fellow Shifters orient on their professional path while working on yours.


Interested? Send us a message or join our online board interest drink!

Sign up for the drinks here

Or email your CV and a short motivation to communication@iesashift.nl by January 18th, 2021

ByIESA Shift

Vacancies Berenshot

*Dutch only*

Ben jij net (of bijna) afgestudeerd van de universiteit en klaar voor een kick-start van jouw carrière? Heb jij interesse in het adviesvak en ben je tegelijkertijd maatschappelijk betrokken? En wil jij bij een organisatie werken met korte lijnen en superveel leuke projecten? Dan is een stage of traineeship bij Berenschot iets voor jou! Berenschot zoekt stagiairs en trainees die willen werken aan de energietransitie, fysieke omgeving en (duurzame) mobiliteit. Bekijk alle vacatures via onderstaande links.

Traineeships

Stages

Over Berenschot

Wij zijn Berenschot. 80 jaar geleden grondlegger van het adviesvak en sindsdien onderdeel van de absolute top. Met onze kennis en expertise op het gebied van inhoud, context en transitiekracht helpen wij organisaties in de Benelux en internationaal. Hierbij investeren we voortdurend in toptalent, innovatie en ontwikkeling van kennis. 

Berenschot biedt een inspirerende werkomgeving, waarin interessante en afwisselende opdrachtgevers en gedreven collega’s je uitdagen om je te blijven ontwikkelen. Ons bureau zit vol inspirerende en eigenwijze individuen die allen dezelfde passie delen: adviseren aan publieke en private organisaties. Ingewikkelde vraagstukken omzetten in werkbare constructies. Door ons brede werkterrein en onze brede expertise kunnen opdrachtgevers ons inschakelen voor uiteenlopende opdrachten, zoals: verandertrajecten, stakeholdermanagement , evaluaties, procesbegeleiding, beleidsonderzoeken, en visie- en strategieontwikkeling.

ByPromo Committee

4 Tips to (de)motivate yourself

Physical lectures, Bouwpub, stale machine coffee and small talk in the bike shed made room for browser issues, quarantines, muted educators and Zoom showers. Concentration problems, motivation loss and lack of interaction are at the order of the day. In case you haven’t managed to lose your study motivation over the past near-year just yet and would like to join the lament, or when you find yourself being demotivated and are in need of some proper reverse-psychology* to get remotivated: this article might be exactly what you need.

1. Start doubting your academic ability. Let’s be honest: you didn’t end up getting accepted into this masters’ program because you’ve spent years and years of studying, examining the world around us, developing yourself, understanding the principles of research in an IE related field and mastering the art of earning ECTs. It was all a mere combination of paying thousands of Euros on tuition fees and stumbling upon an enormous amount of questionable luck that got you here. Assigning your current academic position to your intelligence or past efforts is sheer nonsense. In case you feel capable, make sure to avoid talking with novices/laymen about the courses you take, and looking back at previously taken hurdles or conquered challenges. Start the day by looking in the mirror while telling yourself that you’re dumb and end the day with a disparagement to boost your self-doubt.

2. Drop the towel. Aside from doubting your academic ability, be skeptical of your capacity to exert efforts at all. Studies show that students’ beliefs about their academic ability and capacity for effort are inherently linked to academic withdrawal (Legault et al., 2006). Past exams, papers, presentations and especially your bachelors’ dissertation all passed themselves and didn’t require any planning, efforts or coping strategies from your side. The last thing you’ve done during your pre-IE epoch is build muscles to make putting your shoulder to the wheel ever be fruitful. It’s hard to even throw in the towel when you don’t have any muscles, so just drop it. Scrap any new-course resolutions you might have and show the world your finest study flight behavior. If you’re not ready to scrap your resolutions just yet, start setting the bar way too high to make sure to disappoint yourself. Motivation is influenced by the perceived marginal value of progress (Heath et al., 1999), so stop celebrating small successes and complimenting yourself on taking any kind of effort because they have a strong potential of relighting your fire.

3. Grow antipathy towards the program. Do what you dislike, and dislike what you do. When tasks are perceived as uninteresting, uninspiring, monotonous or dull, they can severely temper students’ enthusiasm (Legault et al., 2006). Assume your teachers choose the most tedious types of assessment just to bully you, and pick the most boring topics for your assignments. Avoid interest triggers and choose electives that sound either utterly boring or extremely complicated for people with your bachelors’ background. Devalue course objectives and depreciate any of the insights you’ll gain. Burn your motivation letter, and never talk about the relevance of our field and what you hoped to achieve by registering for this degree. Reflecting on your choice of masters’ is ok, as it might make you realize that it’s probably best to drop out. By all means avoid sparking your interest or making course elements ‘fun’, and kindly request instructors to stop using Kahoot.

4. Avoid social interaction or seek discouragement. If you have roommates, try finding a place for yourself or lock your door and pretend you’re never home. Strengthen your isolation by being a jerk to others. In case you’re already on bad terms with your roommates it’s alright to roam around them so that you can occasionally pickup some negative vibes. When finding yourself in a social situation, stick to chitchat and abstain from sharing how you feel. Disable your webcam and microphone when attending lectures or group discussions. If you’re in a Shift committee, step out to upgrade your feelings of disengagement.

Although the presence of motivation isn’t necessarily related to academic achievement, it does lower distress while studying (Baker, 2004). Definitely something worthwhile pursuing in these home-bound times. Reverse-psychology doesn’t always do the trick but hopefully at least I managed to make you either smile or cringe. If not, I hope you know that we’re all in this together (a.k.a. you’re not alone) and that (re-)connecting with fellow Shifties is bliss.

By Esther Bliek


*= Is reverse-psychology not really your cup of tea and was this article of no use to you? Here are 5 ways to make yourself study when you have zero motivation.

References

Baker, S. R. (2004). Intrinsic, extrinsic, and amotivational orientations: Their role in university adjustment, stress, well-being, and subsequent academic performance. Current Psychology, 23(3), 189-202.

Heath, C., Larrick, R. P., & Wu, G. (1999). Goals as reference points. Cognitive psychology, 38(1), 79-109.

Legault, L., Green-Demers, I., & Pelletier, L. (2006). Why do high school students lack motivation in the classroom? Toward an understanding of academic amotivation and the role of social support. Journal of educational psychology, 98(3), 567.

ByIESA Shift

Life next to IE: transforming the food system with Gros

It’s big, edible and omnipresent; the food industry is everywhere. And so are its problems. The food system is notorious for its major issues such as resource over-extraction, eutrophication, underpayment and power abuse. With his recently founded organization Gros, Industrial Ecology student Simon Schilt seeks to find an answer to these worrisome developments. Lowik Pieters

Read More
ByIESA Shift

Winter Activities

As the days get shorter and the weather gets colder, it becomes harder to do some Corona Proof activities outside. Therefore, we came up with some interesting indoor activities to get you through the coming winter. So put on your oversized sweater, get a steaming mug of tea and sit near the fireplace (read radiator) for some fresh ideas that do not include more Netflix time. 

Getting creative 

If you want to reduce your screen time, it is always an idea to get your creative side in the open. Ofcourse, you can draw or write things, but have you ever considered knitting a scarf or crocheting a stuffed animal (also works great as a Christmas present!).

You can start with knitting and crocheting quite easy: all you need is wool (around 1 euro a piece at Wibra/Action), a crochet hook (not even an euro) and knitting needles (you can all buy them at the Action/Wibra). 

Next, you will need some starting patterns. Since I can recommend you to start in your own language (translating different types of stitches can be quite confusing), you might have to Google some yourself. But it is a rewarding task: you can have hours of fun for a few euros, it’s relaxing after a day of hard work and: you can make something nice out of it! 

If you don’t know what you should make: you can also try to crochet or knit with waste plastics. This is how I made this bag. You first make plarn (plastic yarn), and then knit/crochet your pattern. 

Talking about Christmas, since we are kind of skipping a lot of important parties, bring Christmas inside your house! We did some research for you, and watched a lot of Hallmark movies to get inspired. You can create a lot of your own ornaments.

Create an ornament from old christmas cards, or make a garland from waste paper. You can also make garlands from popcorn! A lot of creative ideas can be found on Pinterest.

Next to decorating, the Christmas spirit is important. Spread some joy by creating the most amazing (Christmas) cards or letters. Send a heartfelt letter to your grandma which you couldn’t visit, your fellow students or to a random person who could use some love. Spread some joy with your words!

Food and drinks

Not in a creative mood? Or you prefer creating food and drinks?  Amaze yourself, and learn some new ways of cooking. Try to create vegetarian or vegan food, or create something from scratch from an entire different cuisine than you’re used to. Make your tastebuds familiar with new flavors by creating our new recipe we shared in the newsletter.

You can make your own Gluhwein with a bottle of red wine, an orange, 2 pieces of cinamon, 4 kruidnagels, 2 steranijs, 3 spoons of honey and 100 ml of cognac/brandy. In which you put everything together in a pan, and let it simmer for 15 minutes (Don’t let it cook!), get the rest out of the pan and serve your drink 😊.

You can find the dutch recipe here

Another idea for a rainy afternoon is to fill your day by baking some nice Christmas cookies or cupcakes! Believe me, you can fill a whole evening with decorating them (and eating them).

With all these kinds of nice foods and drinks you can also surprise your roommates with an evening of winter wonderland (or other theme night) with homemade Gluhwein and cookies, in which you can create your own Lichtjesavond!  

Zero Waste 

Now you might have some spare time, you can invest it in going zero waste! As we have a lot of single use products, you can reuse this by using sustainable products. You might even want to create a bag which you can bring when the festival season starts again. 

As you may notice, now we are home all day: we use a lot of single use plastics, even when we’re at home. Therefore you can make a lot of reusable products: did you know you can get a lot of fresh food in a reusable bag? Think of all the reduced plastics by buying at the local market, or at the baker. 

Or go through your bathroom cabinet: did you know you can make a lot of household products yourself? 

Visit this website to get inspired.

Reading

One of my favorite hobbies I picked up during the lockdown again is reading. When I was little I used to have a book with me all the time, and I have read my way through my local library. I rediscovered that it’s still the best way to escape our reality for a while. And, it doesn’t have to be expensive! Go to your local secondhand store, like Rataplan, where you can buy them for an euro per piece.

Another thing is the bookshare libraries, which you can see in the streets. In Delft there are a lot of these, where you can borrow a book, or leave a book.

Or, exchange books with your friends. You can even start your own book club.

Also, did you know the University of Leiden also has some reading books? Just search their library page for a specific book. No inspiration for a book? Check out Goodreads.

More ideas? Let us know! Send us a message and maybe your idea will be in the next newsletter! 

ByIESA Shift

Autumn Activity: Pumpkin Curry Recipe

When sitting at home in these windy, rainy autumn days you might be in need of some serious comfort food. With this easy recipe you can make a delicious vegan curry with the vegetable of the season: the pumpkin. Not only nice to carve out or put in your pumpkin spiced oatmeal latte, but also just for eating. I like to peel the skin off, but you can also leave it on for some more bite. Serve with naan, rice, (vegan) yoghurt, freshly chopped cilantro and lime slices!


Ingredients (4p):
Sunflower oil
2 tbsp. mustard seeds

2 tbsp. dried chili flakes

2 medium sized onions (chopped)

1 inch of fresh ginger (grated)

2 gloves of garlic (grated)

4 tbsp. curry powder

1 tbsp. cumin powder

2 tsp. Sereh (lemon grass powder)

1 tsp. dried mint

1 tsp. of salt

1 kg of pumpkin (peeled, in pieces)

1 lime (half for juice, the other for garnishing)

50 ml vegetable stock

400 ml coconut milk

Recipe:
Heat the oil and add the mustard seeds and chili flakes. Once the mustard seeds begin to pop, stir in the chopped onion. Fry the onion over medium heat for about 5 minutes. Add the ginger and garlic and fry briefly.

Stir the curry powder, sereh powder, and cumin into the onions and fry for 30 seconds. Then add the pumpkin.
Pour in the chopped tomatoes and coconut milk and stir well before adding the stock. Season with a teaspoon of salt and the dried mint. Bring to the boil and cook the pumpkin without a lid for about 25 minutes (until you like it the texture of the pumpkin).
Season the curry with the lime juice and garnish with the finely chopped cilantro.

ByIESA Shift

Career Webinar (25 – 27 November)

So what kind of job perspective will you have after finishing what you start? Starting with the sustainable career webinar 25/27 November we will give you an an idea about the several career options you have after graduating from IE.

During this free(!) three days event you can meet with a lot of interesting companies. On top of that, you can even participate in a lottery!

Sign up here


On Wednesday, November 25th you can meet:

Rijkswaterstaat 15h

Rijkswaterstaat is part of our government and is ‘working to make the Netherlands safe, secure, attractive and accessible for all’. They do this by focusing on subjects like water, environment and mobility. In this webinar they will focus on their challenges as one of the leading material consumers in making Dutch infrastructure more sustainable .

Although they require their employees to speak Dutch, the webinar will be in English.

Horticulture HortiHeroes, Greenport West-Holland & World Horti Center 16h10

One of the biggest challenges we currently face as society is the question whether we are able to provide sufficient, healthy food for everyone in the near future. Solutions need to consider the increasing pressure on land-use, the environment and biodiversity by human activities. Therefore, only sustainable innovations, in which people work together with their environment, instead of against are possible. How exactly these innovations will look like, is a challenge which the Dutch horticulture sector has accepted. It develops the most advanced greenhouses and greenhouse technology, in which crops , plants and flowers can grow by using minimum amounts of water, fossil energy, chemical fertilizers and pesticide.

–> in the signup this presentation is referred to as Innovatie Ondernemen in Transitie.

SBM Offshore 17h20

SBM Offshore believes the oceans will provide the world with safe, sustainable and affordable energy for generations to come. The energy transition is a key element. In this webinar SBM Offshore will focus on the trade-offs between safe, sustainable & affordable


On Thursday, November 26th you can meet:

LBP Sight 15h

This consultancy knows everything about sustainable solutions with regard to the built environment, spaces and environment. You can use their knowledge during the production, realization and use phase of circular building projects. In this webinar they will focus on the true value of LCA and its contribution to a sustainable society. Especially interesting for the people who are currently following the advanced LCA course

Coolrec 16h10

This corporation is all about recycling of electrical appliances, plastics and non-ferro metals. They focus on circular economy, social returns and compliancy, by closing loops, team work and globalizing the market. In this webinar their focus will be on the challenges of plastic recycling. An very relevant topic at the moment regarding the low oil price, making it harder for them to compete with virgin plastics.  

AT Osborne 17h20

The consultancy of AT Osborne focuses on a lot different aspects: from Infrastructure to mobility and from water to legal services. They strive to make the world a better place by practical solutions and connecting. In this webinar they will host a role play in which several stakeholders have to find multiple benefits in transforming a neighbourhood with regards to sustainability.


And on Friday, November 27th you can meet with:

CE Delft 15h

The research and consultancy of CE Delft focuses on helping to build the sustainable world we all strive to live in. Their focus is on energy, transport and resource issues. They help government agencies, NGO’s and industries to create structural change.

KPN 16h10

KPN is major Dutch telecommunications and IT corporation that provides fixed and mobile connections essential for our daily life. Recognized as one of the most sustainable telecom companies in the world, KPN is striving to make their business sustainable at an optimal level via climate neutrality and circular operation. In the webinar, you will be able to learn their efforts in reducing three scopes of emissions and achieving material circularity, and hear practical tips from three MSc students working at KPN’s Energy & Circular Economy Team.


Brighten up your world and everyone’s around you!

ByIESA Shift

COVID-19: Inform your study advisor

In these times of a global pandemic information and communication are essential tools in combating this threat. Which is why we’d like to remind you all of the rapidly changing measures to keep both you and your friends safe. Regarding your studies, both Universities provide frequent updates in their own websites. Please check here for Leiden University and for TU Delft

Furthermore, if you or any of your roommates or close friends are tested positive for COVID-19 we urgently ask you to inform your study advisor. We’re all part of a larger community and we should use the communicative capabilities of this community to our advantage.

ByPromo Committee

Prosperity within limits: is it possible?

Book review by Lowik Pieters:
Prosperity without growth by Tim Jackson

It seems like the world is changing rapidly, but one thing has been stable for centuries: our need for (economic) growth. To date, the EU and the UN stick to the mantra of ‘green growth’, arguing that over time, our economic system will function separately from its resource demands. Tim Jackson, Professor of Sustainable Development at the University of Surrey, UK, immediately exposes that ‘decoupling’ material and energy input from economic growth is a myth. In his book Prosperity Without Growth, Jackson doesn’t preach a post-material phantasy, he offers serious solutions to a flaw in the fabric of our economies.

Prosperity Without Growth: Foundations For The Economy Of Tomorrow was first published in 2010 and immediately gained attention among scholars and economy students: why was ‘post-growth’ economic thinking not part of their curriculum? When it’s second edition was published in 2017, the book was no longer regarded a radical narrative. Instead, it offered a clear vision for a post financial crisis world, with proposals for changes in the financial sector.

Tim Jackson inspired Kate Raworth to write her bestseller Doughnut Economics and his book is seen as a ‘landmark in the sustainability debate’. The Guardian called it a manifesto for an emerging movement that is trying to convince economists that there’s more than GDP growth. In fact, GDP growth is eventually limiting prosperity because of its unequal distribution. Today, many countries acknowledge that GDP isn’t a good indicator for prosperity measurements, but they seem to fear to take action on how to deal with prosperity issues differently.

The dilemma of growth

Tim Jackson’s ‘dilemma of growth’ resulted in his book Prosperity Without Growth and several scholarly publications. According to Jackson, prosperity means flourishing, a steady state that strives for wellbeing for everyone. This isn’t a very new way of thinking, though. Already in 1973 the book Small Is Beautiful was published by economist Fritz Schumacher, who urged economies to transition to regional systems, focusing on social and ecological principles. It reads like a hands-on economy focused sequel to Limits to Growth. 

In what way is this book different from Doughnut Economics and earlier publications that address the dilemma of growth? Jacksons work offers a solid theoretical background, but also includes concrete solutions to problems of capitalism (such as employee ownership, revitalization of social investment, changing investments in general). Would these solutions be the perfect answer to neoliberalism?

ByPromo Committee

Coastal engineering: going multifunctional?

By Ankita Singhvi.

A quarter of the world’s population lives within 100km of a shoreline, with urbanisation on the rise. Coastal space is scarce and valuable, but it is becoming increasingly vulnerable due to climate change. The main hazards that the coast needs to be protected against are erosion (the loss or displacement of land, or the consistent removal of rocks and sediment along a shoreline due to waves, currents, tides or storms) and flooding (when sea height exceeds the elevation of land and covers it, caused by high tides or storms). In order to protect the coast, various interventions are taken on the shoreline: e.g. dikes, dunes, seawalls, beach nourishment. In particular, multifunctional coastal protection has increasingly been receiving attention due to its promise of enhancing adaptation to the threats of climate change, as well as relieving the pressures of increasing urbanisation. Multifunctionality refers to the multiple benefits that an intervention can provide beyond risk reduction. The concept emphasizes the explicit interweaving of ecological, social, and economic functions. What does this look like in practise? Here, I will describe two cases in the Netherlands – one ‘nature-based intervention’ and one ‘grey’ intervention.

Sand Motor, Monster

The coast of Monster has a large, man-made hook-shaped peninsula (see image above) – one of the few interruptions to the otherwise uniform shoreline of the Netherlands. This peninsula is a beach nourishment project called the Sand Motor (also referred to as Sand Engine and Zand Motor). It was constructed by placing 21.5 million m3 of sand on the beach with the aim of reducing the speed of coastal erosion and protecting upland infrastructure from storm surges or high tides. Typical nourishment projects are a repetitive process; a coastline is artificially replenished every five years. In contrast, five times the volume of the average sand nourishment was used at the Sand Motor with the expectation that replenishment would become unnecessary along the Delfland Coast for the next twenty years.

The Sand Motor’s design uses an ecosystem-based conceptualisation of multifunctionality and emphasizes ‘building with nature’ in its design philosophy. In other words, the multiple benefits that the coast provides in addition to protection are dependent on the newly created sandy ecosystem. The hook-shape of the peninsula is crucial for the creation of a shallow lagoon, which supports kitesurfing, recreational swimming, fish habitats and soil organisms. The sediment size and grading of the sand, as well as the presence of shells allows dune formation, which supports an underground fresh water lens and above-ground vegetation and habitats for wildlife. The width of the beach supports recreation, and the entire system is a pilot project that benefits research and education.

Scheveningen Boulevard, The Hague

Scheveningen’s boulevard has a 2km long dike integrated into it for the purpose of flood defence. The boulevard has an undulating course that follows the historical coastline. On the sea side of the boulevard, the beach has been widened to reduce the impact of waves on the flood defence structure during extremely high water. This allows a lower crest height for the dike to suffice. Furthermore, sand supplementation has made the beach ~50 metres wider with the aim of creating a smooth transition from the boulevard to the beach. The core principles that guided the design of the boulevard are: accessibility, vitality, spatial quality and strengthening the identity of Scheveningen.

The boulevard takes a spatial planning conceptualisation of multifunctionality: it uses the dike-in-boulevard to increase the capacity of the shoreline to provide services such as parking spots, hotels, residential buildings and commercial zones – which are all built on top of the dike. The premise of this multifunctional dike is that it is more cost-effective than a conventional dike because it optimises land use by providing multiple real-estate development opportunities. In addition to coastal protection, the dike serves the town with a mixed-use program that should be interesting for both tourist and business visitors, and secure a year-round programme to attract more long-stay visitors. Scheveningen is the most popular seaside resort of the Netherlands, and the dike aims to support this function rather than subtract from it.

 

To summarise, both coastal protection interventions showcase multifunctionality in different ways: in the Sand Motor, it stems from the ecosystem, and at Scheveningen it stems from the urban system. In the context of increasing scarcity of space in urban areas, it no longer makes sense to build mono-functional infrastructure. The cases show how multiple functions can increase the adaptivity of an intervention to an uncertain future by making it useful even when there are no immediete flood or erosion hazards. Multiple functions help in building public and political support for large investments, and they support the creation of multiple lines of defence – leading to safer, higher quality spatial planning for our cities.